Agency went way overboard

Lance Armstrong should not have been stripped of his victories.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency is a regulatory agency gone berserk. It smells of a sort of ex-post facto legislation banned by the Constitution.

Why wasn't Armstrong caught in the act -- either after a stage or at the end of the Tour -- by Tour organizers who have disqualified other racers before?

Armstrong won seven Tour de France titles, which gave organizers ample opportunities to test.

Who are the winners now? Those who came in second? Are we sure they didn't dope?

The Tour takes place in a foreign country. Has the USADA the authority to regulate what happens in foreign countries? Could the USADA have disqualified a winner if he were a Spaniard or an Italian? It disqualified Armstrong because he's an American.

A congressional committee should investigate. Regulatory authorities aren't given dictatorial powers. USADA went way overboard on this one.

Thirty years from now, if a grandchild asks his grandfather, "Who was Lance Armstrong?" the answer will undoubtedly be that Armstrong was a great athlete, perhaps the greatest of all times, who won seven Tour de France titles

George Naniche

Moraga

Armstrong should not lose medals


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I'm prescribed testosterone (Androderm) by my primary physician.

This natural male hormone is a steroid which I, and other older men, need supplemented to increase strength. Androderm is a patch I place on my upper arm daily so the testosterone can enter my body transdermally.

Lance Armstrong, like other athletes, allegedly received a testosterone supplement to increase his strength. Armstrong should not be stripped of his seven Tour de France titles anymore than I should be stripped of my title of senior citizen. We've earned them.

Ralph Hoffmann

Walnut Creek

Armstrong should not be banned

Lance Armstrong should not have been banned by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. The fact that he was just goes to show that if the government wants to get you, it will.

Federal prosecutors dropped their doping charges against Armstrong just before the USADA filed its charges. It is possible that the U.S. government dropped its criminal case in order to continue prosecution through the anti-doping agency, which is not governed by the same rules of law.

Although the agency is listed as a nonprofit organization, it receives 74 percent of its funding from the government and 26 percent from the U.S. Olympic Committee.

Unlike what federal prosecutors would face in court, the anti-doping agency doesn't have to show the accused the evidence it will have to defend itself against.

In the rest of the world, the International Olympic Committee governs those who participate in Olympic sports. Since its creation by Congress in 2000, the USADA has sought international control of its Olympic athletes. Armstrong may be nothing but a pawn in a battle between these two governing bodies.

David L. Peck

Benicia

He has forfeited his opportunity

Lance Armstrong could and should have fought to the end, even without lawyers, if he were innocent. Armstrong's main defense, "never tested positive," was Marion Jones' -- until she did.

Ivan Basso and Jan Ullrich, his main competitors didn't either, until the doctor was caught with their blood in Operacion Puerto.

Claims of vendetta or jealousy? I doubt USADA could line up enough people to falsely testify on that basis only. USADA shouldn't have to reveal all the witnesses to allow Armstrong's legal/PR team to shred them beforehand, until and unless the case goes forward, and by opting out, he forfeited that opportunity.

Don Yee

Foster City

USADA should give us the complete story

Lance Armstrong should not lose his titles.

Armstrong has been tested more than 500 times and nothing. The USADA should give us the complete story on its decision.

Herman C. Koberle

Pleasanton

Lance cheated and so did competition

Lance Armstrong was rightly stripped of his medals because he cheated.

Sadly, all the second-place finishers also cheated in each of those races, as well.

Is there an honorable man in cycling whose performance is medal-worthy? I hope so. If not, keep the medals in the vault. How much is a man's honor worth in the world of cycling?

Eric Stoddard

San Ramon

Lance asked to prove that he is not guilty

Lance Armstrong has been tested many times and always tested clean. He has been investigated since 1999 and he has never been found guilty using due process, yet this agency can do what it did in private without due process using unsubstantiated statements with no physical evidence.

To me, it stinks that this has happened. It seems that he is guilty unless he can prove he is innocent, which he won't. The burden of proof should be on the anti-doping agency, and it should be held to a higher standard.

Dana Craig

Concord

If they strip Lance, then strip them all

The USADA has never proved that he has ever taken any type of drugs.

If it is going to strip Lance Armstrong of all his medals, then Barry Bonds' home run record should be taken away.

Bonds never had more than 58 home runs in a season, then all of a sudden he hits 73 home runs in one season and he wants us to believe that he was not taking drugs.

If Lance Armstrong is stripped of his titles, then let's strip all the athletes who have been accused of taking drugs of their records.

Patricia Hofer

San Leandro