Click photo to enlarge
Bart Trickel of Oakland, Calif. makes a photograph of the sunset, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2007 from the corner of Chadbourne Way and Crestmont Drive in the hills above the city. Smoke in the air from fires south of San Jose made the sunset extra dramatic. (D. Ross Cameron/The Oakland Tribune)
OAKLAND - It looks like Los Angeles on a bad day, but in truth the haze that has turned the sun into a hot, red ball is more of that smoke from the Moonlight Fire in Plumas County far to the north of us, the National Weather Service says.

Well, if you live in the South Bay, you're also getting zapped with smoke from the giant and growing Lick Fire in Henry Coe State Park near Gilroy, Weather Service meteorologist Dave Soroka says.

There's still more bad news. It's gonna' be hot, hot, hot in most of the Bay Area this afternoon: about 85 degrees in Oakland, 80 in San Francisco, a sizzling 92 in Livermore and 93 in Concord.

"Here in Monterey it's going to be about 75," Soroka said this morning. The Weather Service operates its Northern California forecasting office there.

The only hope for the Bay Area is the south facing portion of the San Mateo Coast and Santa Cruz, Soroka says. "Right at the immediate coast around Santa Cruz there's a low cloud and fog bank moving from south to north and some areas, like the south-facing shore of San Mateo County is going to get fog," he said.

"But everywhere inland it's going to continue to be hot and smoky," Soroka predicts.

In Sacramento, the California Department of Forestry says the two big north state fires unfortunately are still raging.

The Moonlight Fire in the Plumas National Forest 200 miles north of the Bay Area has grown overnight 28,000 acres and is only 8 percent contained, the CDF's Daniel Berlant said. Over 1,600 firefighters are battling that blaze.

South of the Bay Area the Lick Fire between Gilroy and Morgan Hill jumped over night and now has consumed 18,905 acres. Over 1,700 firefighters - many from Bay Area fire departments are on the scene. The fire, which has been aided by low humidity, is about 25 percent contained.