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One Goh, accused of seven murders in the mass shooting at Oikos University talks to David Klaus, Deputy Public Defender, before entering a not-guilty plea in court at the Renee C. Davidson Superior Courthouse on Monday, April 30, 2012. (Laura A. Oda/Staff)

OAKLAND -- The murder case against One Goh, a Korean national accused of killing seven people during a rampage at a private Oakland university earlier this year, was suspended Monday as a defense attorney asked for a mental evaluation of his client.

Assistant public defender David Klaus told a superior court judge that his client is refusing to speak to him and that a mental evaluation is necessary to determine if Goh, 43, is fit to stand trial.

Under California law, Klaus' request immediately placed the case on hold as the court directs two psychologists to evaluate Goh to determine if he understands the charges filed against him and if he can properly assist Klaus in his defense.

Klaus' request, however, appeared to agitate Goh, who yelled something to the judge after Klaus said he wanted to determine if Goh was mentally fit to stand trial. Goh's statement to the court could not be heard but afterward he looked at his attorney and shook his head left to right.

Goh is accused of killing six students and a receptionist at the struggling Oikos University that was located in a building near Oakland International Airport. Goh, who was once enrolled at the school but dropped out, was supposedly upset that the school refused to refund his tuition after he decided not to take classes.

The killing spree began on the morning of April 2 inside the small university on Edgewater Drive in Oakland when, police say, Goh walked into a classroom and started shooting students.


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Goh allegedly used a .45-caliber handgun and brought four additional magazines with him to the school.

After the shootings, Goh stole a student's car and drove to a Safeway in Alameda, where he called a family member and said that he killed students, police say.

Oakland police Chief Howard Jordan had said Goh walked into the Safeway store and asked a clerk if he could use a telephone. The clerk stood by as Goh called a relative, Jordan said, and overheard the suspect talking about the shooting. The clerk notified store security, who detained Goh and called Alameda police, Jordan said.

In interviews with Oakland police, Goh admitted that he went to the college with a .45-caliber handgun and four loaded magazines, that he kidnapped a woman in an office and took her to a classroom, that he shot several people and that he took the car keys of one of his victims and left in the victim's vehicle, according to the affidavit.

After his arrest, Goh went on a hunger strike at Santa Rita Jail, telling authorities that he was refusing to eat because he was ashamed of what he did, the sheriff's department has said.

Since that hunger strike, Goh looked thinner than he was in his booking photo taken the day of the shooting, and on Monday he looked thinner still.

Goh has pleaded not guilty to the crimes.