Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to make community colleges -- not K-12 school districts -- responsible for adult education, with $300 million in additional funding, follows four years of severe cutbacks to the state's adult schools, which serve immigrants, refugees, school dropouts, parents, the disabled, seniors and ex-convicts.

In 2009, new funding rules allowed K-12 school districts to spend adult education dollars however they wished. The fund was also cut by about 20 percent.

Below is a before-and-after comparison of school district spending on adult education and students enrolled in adult ed courses. The 2012-13 estimate is based on a survey by the state Legislative Analyst's Office. Enrollment information is from Oakland Adult and Career Education and MetroEd, a nonprofit in San Jose that offers adult ed programs.

  • K-12 spending on adult education: $750 million in 2007-08; $300 million in 2012-13.

  • Oakland Adult and Career Education: 25,000 students in 2007-08; 1,300 in 2012-13.

  • MetroEd (San Jose): 10,000 students in 2007-08; 2,300 in 2012-13.

    Read the state Legislative Analyst's Office report "Restructuring Adult Education" at http://bit.ly/XYdMmj.

    The legislative analyst's critique of the governor's plan begins at Page 41 of this report at http://bit.ly/ZmvNrq

    See the concerns of three state organizations -- the Association of California School Administrators, the California Adult Education Administrators Association and the California Council for Adult Education -- at http://bit.ly/VQnvvu.