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Garbage truck drivers honored the five hour strike from 3-8 am Friday, March 15, 2013 by their co-workers in union ILWU Local 6 at the Waste Management headquarters in Oakland, Calif. About 200 workers from the International Longshore & Warehouse Union Local 6 which includes office workers and recycling and landfill workers from the Davis Street Transfer Center and the Altamont landfill, participated in a 5 hour strike to bring attention to unfair labor practices by Waste Management. (Laura A. Oda/Staff)

Recycling and clerical workers were back on the job following a five-hour strike Friday morning at facilities in Oakland, San Leandro, Hayward and in the Livermore-Altamont area.

About 200 workers from the International Longshore Warehouse Union Local 6 walked off the job about 3 a.m. over what the workers said were abuses of employee rights, said Craig Merrilees, communications director for the union.

While the nature of the alleged abuses was not immediately known, those reportedly impacted were workers from recycling, landfill and office functions in the Davis Street and Altamont Pass areas.

Garbage truck drivers went on what Merrilees called a "sympathy strike," stopping work in support of their co-workers, who belong to a separate union. Employees of both unions returned to work at 8 a.m.

Residential waste and recycling pickup services for Waste Management of Alameda County customers will continue as scheduled Friday, and any routes interrupted by the strike will be completed Saturday, said David Tucker, spokesman for the company.

"Our customers' waste and recyclables will be picked up despite ILWU Local 6 unsanctioned labor action," Tucker said. "Our drivers, Teamsters Local 70, showed up for work to make sure that we meet the needs of our customers."

The ILWU Local 6 strike caused a delay in the launch of Waste Management's commercial, roll-off and residential collection service this morning, Tucker said.

According to Tucker, Waste Management and ILWU Local 6 have been negotiating a new contract with the assistance of a federal mediator.

"Our efforts have been to find a balance between the needs of our employees in terms of rising compensation cost and the needs of the company to remain competitive and continue its investments in Alameda County, while protecting our ratepayers and franchise cities," said Barry Skolnick, president of Waste Management of Alameda County.

The company and Machinists Local 1546 agreed to a new six-year deal on Feb. 23.

Staff photographer Laura A. Oda contributed to this report. Contact Erin Ivie at eivie@bayareanewsgroup.com. Follow her at Twitter.com/erin_ivie.