OAKLAND -- Eighty-three years after succumbing to injuries suffered when he was hit by a car while directing traffic, Timothy Duane was included Thursday in the somber roll call of Oakland police officers killed in the line of duty.

And his name will eventually be etched into the marble memorial wall at police headquarters that already bears the names of 51 other Oakland officers killed on duty between 1867 and 2009.

Duane was recognized Thursday at the annual memorial service for fallen officers, sponsored by the Police Department and the Oakland Police Officers Association. At least 300 relatives, including some toddlers, as well as city officials, current officers and others attended the hourlong event at police headquarters.

Oakland police Officer Timothy Duane, who died in April 1930 after he was hit by a car while directing traffic, was included Thursday in the somber roll
Oakland police Officer Timothy Duane, who died in April 1930 after he was hit by a car while directing traffic, was included Thursday in the somber roll call of Oakland police officers killed in the line of duty. ((Courtesy of Oakland Police Officers Association))

In researching whose names should be part of the ceremony, Duane's was somehow overlooked by police and union officials. The department was not made aware of his death in the line of duty until receiving a letter from his great-granddaughter in February 2012 requesting his name be added to the memorial wall.

Duane, a widower at the time with three children, was hit by a car April 9, 1930, while directing traffic at 10th Avenue and East 14th Street (now International Boulevard) and died of his injuries April 18. He was 58.

OPOA's research confirmed the details of Duane's death, and his name will now be a permanent part of all ceremonies.


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But officials have been unable to contact the great-granddaughter or any other relatives to tell them her request has been granted and that Duane's name was added to the state officer memorial wall Monday in Sacramento and will eventually be added to the national police memorial in Washington, D.C..

Acting Chief of Police Anthony Toribio told the audience he personally knew 12 of those killed.

"They were my brothers, our brothers," he said.

Sgt. Barry Donelan, president of the city's police union, said, "We are delighted that we are able to add a long overlooked death to our wall of honor, but we are disappointed we have not been able to reach the great-granddaughter."

The officers' deaths were a "stark reminder to those who now wear the Oakland police badge," and they will never be forgotten by "those left behind who marvel at their sacrifice," Toribio said.

OAKLAND -- Eighty-three years after succumbing to injuries suffered when he was hit by a car while directing traffic, Timothy Duane was included Thursday in the somber roll call of Oakland police officers killed in the line of duty.

And his name will eventually be etched into the marble memorial wall at police headquarters that already bares the names of 51 other Oakland officers killed on duty between 1867 and 2009.

Duane was recognized Thursday at the annual memorial service for fallen officers, sponsored by the police department and the Oakland Police Officers Association. At least 300 relatives, including some toddlers, as well as city officials, current officers and others attended the hourlong event at police headquarters.

In researching whose names should be part of the ceremony, Duane's was somehow overlooked by police and union officials. The department was not made aware of his death in the line of duty until receiving a letter from his great-granddaughter in February 2012 requesting his name be added to the memorial wall.

Duane, a widower at the time with three children, was hit by a car April 9, 1930, while directing traffic at 10th Avenue and East 14th Street (now International Boulevard) and died of his injuries April 18. He was 58.

OPOA's research confirmed the details of Duane's death and his name will now be a permanent part of all ceremonies.

But officials have been unable to contact the great-granddaughter or any other relatives to tell them her request has been granted and that Duane's name was added to the state officer memorial wall Monday in Sacramento and will eventually be added to the national police memorial in Washington in the future.

Acting Chief of Police Anthony Toribio told the audience he personally knew 12 of those killed.

"They were my brothers, our brothers," he said.

Sgt. Barry Donelan, president of the city's police union, said, "We are delighted that we are able to add a long overlooked death to our wall of honor, but we are disappointed we have not been able to reach the great-granddaughter."

The officers' deaths were a "stark reminder to those who now wear the Oakland police badge" and they will never be forgotten by "those left behind who marvel at their sacrifice," Toribio said.

One of the most poignant moments of the solemn ceremony came when the names of the 52 killed were read and a rose was added to a floral display in their honor. When the name of Officer William B. Grijalva, fatally shot Dec. 15, 1993, was called his widow, Lucy, carried their 4-year-old grandson, William H. Grijalva, and they pinned the rose as some in the audience wiped away tears.