San Jose unlikely to win suit over A's

San Jose's lawsuit against Major League Baseball regarding the A's attempted relocation to San Jose is not likely to get to first base.

I read the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Flood v. Kuhn and the Curt Flood Act. The court case upheld the precedents in the Federal Baseball Club and Toolson cases that the business of baseball is exempt from federal antitrust laws, even though this reasoning has not been applied to other professional sports.

The Supreme Court said this situation could be changed by Congress.

Congress passed The Curt Flood Law, which applied the antitrust laws to matters directly relating to or affecting employment, but created an exception for franchise relocation, among other matters.

As a longtime Oakland A's fan and season ticket holder, I hope the A's would stay in Oakland. I supported their attempt to move to Fremont, but this did not pan out.

But, at the same time, it is unfair to the A's management for Major League Baseball to delay indefinitely a decision on the A's proposal to move to San Jose.

Theodore R. Bresler

Fremont

Time for Oakland to get it together on A's

The city of Oakland has been given every possible opportunity to make it happen with Major League Baseball stalling the city of San Jose. Now San Jose has tried to raise the stakes with the antitrust lawsuit -- however most bets are that it won't succeed.

Oakland already owns suitable land for a stadium. We say we have backing from East Bay corporations; then go and build it on the north lot of the shovel-ready land the city already owns, has planned and EIR'd.

Use eminent domain to relocate those businesses on San Leandro and 66th, and develop those lots with the likes of a sports museum/Bay Sports Hall of Fame, and casual restaurants that could serve not only folks attending Raiders and A's games, but also travelers coming and going to the airport.

The Coliseum sits on a BART station and an Amtrak station, next to one major freeway with four access points, a mile and a half from another major freeway, a soon-to-be terminus for an airport tram, a major gateway boulevard (Hegenberger), a half mile from East 14th (International if you must), and next to another semi-major street (San Leandro).

Most cities would die for that kind of access.

Oakland, you want to be a major player, then it's time to stop acting like the dysfunctional small backwater town people accuse us of being and act like one of the most exciting cities in America that we want to be. Major and exciting cities simply make it happen.

Anthony Moore

Oakland

Money is driving coverage decisions

In response to a June 21 letter: It is easy to blame Obamacare for Aetna's recent statement of not providing coverage to Californians under the act.

I just wonder what is the real reason for this move. Wait, I've got it. Money, more precisely; the potential loss of money from the higher premiums the company can charge if Obamacare wasn't in effect.

So the 49,000 people mentioned by the writer need to voice their displeasure, and place blame for their loss of coverage with the insurer that is copping out of providing them health care because it won't be able to keep charging them higher premiums.

Morris Soublet

Hayward

We have become a nation that is adrift

I am an immigrant, and if someone asked me whether to come to the U.S. or not, I would tell them to go to China or India.

We have become a nation that produces scapegoating, not product or services. We turn against ourselves and divide ourselves, instead of seeing that we are in a terrible worldwide depression, much of which was caused by the depression in the U.S. created during the George W. Bush years.

No one is gathering us together or focusing on the problems and solving them. The Republican Party has become a party of shameless racists, a national disgrace that has produced the mess that we are in, and yet many of the best minds are among the Republicans. Yet, with their present leadership, who can follow them? Look at poor Marco Rubio. Look at the horrible reception the Republicans are giving him.

The Democrats are not much better. President Barack Obama, instead of providing leadership, has become a weak lame-duck president. Everywhere I go, I see the terrible results of a downturned and depressed economy, and the total change in people's mindsets.

We used to be a nation of avid doers and problem-solvers, we are now a nation of complainers and dumpers.

Let us get together and solve our problems sensibly, compassionately and cheerfully, and show ourselves to be the great nation we should be. Let's start, Bay Area.

Kirsten A. Fraser

Oakland