Who says Condoleezza Rice has no sense of humor?

The former secretary of state under George W. Bush will make a guest appearance on "30 Rock" this season, playing -- get this -- the ex-girlfriend of Alec Baldwin's character Jack Donaghy, "30 Rock" creator and star Tina Fey told Politico.com Thursday.

During the NBC show's first season, Donaghy claimed he had dated a "high-ranking African-American member of the Bush administration," but said he split with his "neocon inamorata" because they weren't compatible.

Maybe this is payback for Baldwin announcing recently that he's leaving the show after 2012. The actor has said he wants to quit acting and go into politics.

Fey, who's promoting her new memoir "Bossypants," made the announcement Thursday during a book signing at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Washington as well as on NPR's "Leonard Lopate Show."

Rice's chief of staff confirmed to E! Online that she would indeed appear on the show, adding that the former secretary of state taped the episode in New York last month.


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Think they'll invade again over this?

Jerry Seinfeld, who performs Saturday at the Paramount Theatre in Oakland, likely had Britons snarling into their clotted cream this week when he jokingly dismissed the April 29 wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton as a "circus act."
The comedian, promoting his stand-up concert tour in England, appeared on the British show "Daybreak." When interviewer Adrian Chiles brought up the royal wedding, Seinfeld went off.
"Well it's a circus act, it's an absurd act," Seinfeld said, according to the Daily Mail. "You know, it's a dress-up. It's a classic English thing of let's play dress-up. Let's pretend that these are special people."

Scott Adams hearts Scott Adams

Bay Area cartoonist and celebrity Scott Adams has fessed up to using an online pseudonym to talk up his virtues and blast his critics, says gossip website Gawker.com.
The "Dilbert" creator has, for months, pretended to be a Scott Adams fan under the handle "PlannedChaos."
It started, Gawker says, with a comment thread on the site MetaFilter, after an Adams Wall Street Journal op-ed drew criticism from readers.