LIVERMORE -- Results of a study on possible consolidation of six of the Tri-Valley's water and sewer agencies into a single district will be presented for the first time to elected officials at a meeting in Livermore on Wednesday.

The first phase of the Tri-Valley Utility Coordination and Integration Study, completed in October, reviewed options for merging services in varying degrees for dealing with potable water, recycled water, wastewater and storm water, It identified 15 services the agencies could improve with more cooperation, and 10 other long-term "major integration" possibilites, recommending some for further analysis.

"This is the first time we're going to have these elected officials hear this information," said Dublin San Ramon Services District general manager Bert Michalczyk. "It's going to be interesting to see what the collective reaction is going to be to all this."

Livermore public works director Dan McIntyre and the study's consultants will present the report to the Utility Coordination Ad Hoc Committee, made of elected officials from Livermore, San Ramon, Dublin, Pleasanton, the Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) and the Zone 7 Water Agency. The six agencies serve about 277,000 residents with a total operating budget of about $130 million.

Committee members will discuss options and provide input on what measures could be implemented soon, and others to be analyzed in a second phase of the study.

"We're part of the way through the process, so the bigger step is going to be going through the nuts and bolts," McIntyre said. "We'd like to get a sounding from the elected officials to see if this is reasonable ... Is it worthwhile?"

In the study, consultant Management Partners recommends looking at several more immediate improvements, such as merging fleet maintenance, water conservation programs, inventory control and management, lab services, sewer and storm drain inspection, and emergency response. Major options suggested for more study include consolidating stormwater management and recycled water services under one entity.

The report also describes seven governance models, ranging from inter-service contracts and public-private partnerships, to the creation of a brand new special district.

A second phase of the study would include cost analysis to determine savings, as well as a detailed examination of benefits and challenges to make it happen. The phase two study would take about one to two years to complete, and could cost between $250,000 and $350,000, a steering committee memo states.

However, McIntyre said utility officials are already hoping to iron out a contract implementing some of the reciprocal services, such as sharing of equipment, later this year. "We've been studying how to more effectively operate together over the past couple of years," McIntyre said. "We already have a lot of existing collaboration, (but) there's a number of ideas we can look at."

The Alameda County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) recommended the Tri-Valley's utility agencies consider forming a consolidated municipal utility district in 2010, to streamline services and reduce costs. According to a staff report, thusfar, a total of 21 committee meetings have been held and more than $200,000 has been committed to the effort.

The Wednesday meeting will be held at the Martinelli Event Center, 3585 Greenville Rd. in Livermore, beginning at 12:45 p.m.

Contact Jeremy Thomas at 925-847-2184. Follow him at Twitter.com/jet_bang.

IF YOU GO:
The joint meeting begins at 12:45 p.m. Wednesday at the Martinelli Event Center, 3585 Greenville Rd., Livermore,