ANTIOCH -- City leaders this week approved a change to Antioch's method of charging developers to serve future growth, establishing a set of one-time charges on builders to cover items such as roads, parks and police services.

Before giving unanimous approval Tuesday, council members said the goal of the new Development Impact Fee program is to create consistency.

"I like the fact, immensely, that there is certainty for impact fees in Antioch. That's a real benefit to us," Councilman Gary Agopian said. "Certainty is what we have had off and on; we'll have it on all the time now."

Under Antioch's old growth system, a prospective developer had to score a certain number of points on a system to receive entitlements and offer certain local improvements, such as roads or parks, said Tina Wehrmeister, the city's community development director. Over time, that morphed into builders offering money, she said.

The council agreed with numbers set in the study of a maximum fee of $7,198 per single-family unit, $4,692 per multifamily unit, and 77 cents per nonresidential square foot. Sewer and water, school district and regional road fees would stay the same.

"The developer will know in Antioch what we're doing, why we're doing it and what we need to do," Agopian said.


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Antioch can revise those fees if it sees shifts in the city's housing mix, which is likely given plans to build around the new eBART station and downtown.

City leaders also rejected a suggestion from the Building Industry Association of the Bay Area to phase in the fee changes.

Antioch's residential development is expected to increase from 34,000 units to 44,800 as the city builds out, according to the study. That would increase its population from about 105,000 to 132,000. Future costs to accommodate that growth is $124.8 million, with new growth being on the hook for about $66.8 million of it.

Scrapers works on the site of the future eBART train yard located east of the Hillcrest Avenue offramp in Antioch, Calif., on Monday, Feb. 11, 2013.
Scrapers works on the site of the future eBART train yard located east of the Hillcrest Avenue offramp in Antioch, Calif., on Monday, Feb. 11, 2013. Members of the media with state and local city officials traveled on a bus tour of the Highway 4 expansion project in East County. The tour took visitors to construction sites on Railroad Ave and the new eBART station being built on Bailey Road. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Staff)

After years of rampant growth in the 1990s, Antioch voters passed Measure U in 1998, an advisory measure aimed at phasing in new home construction to account for land-use and financial planning. It also said that growth should pay its own way through fees and other methods.

Contact Paul Burgarino at 925-779-7164. Follow him at Twitter.com/paulburgarino.