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Referees signal different calls after Monday night's game-ending play. It was finally ruled a touchdown, giving the Seahawks a 14-12 win to defeat the Green Bay Packers at CenturyLink Field on Monday, September 24, 2012, in Seattle, Washington. (John Lok/Seattle Times/MCT)

With the exception of those who made a little coin because of Monday night's now-infamous blown call at the end of the Green Bay Packers-Seattle Seahawks game, there is not a professional football fan who doesn't welcome news that the NFL and the referee's association have come to terms.

It is long past time to replace the replacement referees.

At last, relative order can be restored to the professional gridiron and there should be peace in the valley, metaphorically speaking of course.

The NFL took a hard-line gamble that it could produce a top-quality product even without quality law-enforcement officers. It is now painfully clear it cannot.

While the regular referees have taken fan, coach and player heat for years, the replacement officials demonstrated the job's difficulty in breathtaking fashion.

Anyone who has played football knows that the speed of the game and, thus, the speed of decision-making increases exponentially as one progresses through the levels. It is often that speed that separates high school athletes from college players and college athletes from the professional ranks. The same is true for officials.

If there is any good in this fiasco it will be that beside a new contract, the officials should also have some newfound respect. At least for a while.

Even with an agreement, we must struggle through one more week of the replacements before the regular officials are back on the field. It can't come soon enough for our taste.



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