Tiger Woods has signed a new endorsement deal with Nike that will take the place of a contract set to expire this year, ESPN.com reported.

Mark Steinberg, Woods' agent, said Wednesday that the contract with his client's longtime equipment and apparel sponsor was signed two weeks ago. Steinberg would not disclose terms.

"We're comfortable with where we ended up and the career trajectory that Tiger will be on with Nike," Steinberg told ESPN.com at Muirfield, where Woods will begin play in the British Open on Thursday.

Woods' current deal with Nike was signed in 2006. He has been with Nike since turning pro in 1996, when he signed a five-year deal for a reported $40 million. Various industry reports had his compensation at $100 million over five years starting in 2001. The current contract was for seven years.

"We are thrilled to continue our partnership with Tiger," said Cindy Davis, president of Nike Golf, in a statement released to ESPN.com. "He is one of Nike's most iconic athletes."

Golf Digest put Woods' earnings at $77 million off the course in 2012. It did not break down what he received from Nike, although the figure is believed to be more than $20 million per year.

  • Part defiant and part pragmatist, the head of the Royal & Ancient conceded that all-male clubs are a bedeviling issue but insisted the British Open venues won't be pressured into opening their doors to women.

    At his customary news conference on the eve of the British Open, R&A chief executive Peter Dawson faced a barrage of questions about the no-women-allowed membership at Muirfield and two other clubs in the nine-club rotation, Troon and Royal St. George's.

    He believes the issue has largely been contrived by the media, politicians and interest groups.

    "Obviously the whole issue of gender and single-sex clubs has been pretty much beaten to death recently," he said. "And we do, I assure you, understand that this is divisive. It's a subject that we're finding increasingly difficult, to be honest."

    One reporter, touching on the racial discrimination that once pervaded the game, asked Dawson what was the difference between a male-only club and one that allowed only whites to join.

    "Oh, goodness me, that's a ridiculous question," he replied. "There's a massive difference between racial discrimination, anti-Semitism, where sectors of society are downtrodden and treated very, very badly. And to compare that with a men's golf club, is absurd."

    Dawson knows it's an issue that won't go away -- especially since Augusta National admitted its first female members -- so the organization that oversees golf outside the U.S. plans to address concerns once the Open is completed. He wouldn't say what steps might be taken.

    Augusta National, home of the Masters, invited former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore to become members last summer.

  • Cal's Michael Kim posted an 8-and-6 victory over Brandon Hortt at the U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship in Lorton, Va. Kim won eight holes without dropping one in a match that lasted just 12 holes at Laurel Hill. In another Round of 64 match, Stockton's Joshua Stone ousted qualifying medalist Garrett Rank with a bogey on the first extra hole.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.