Q I happened to spot the column on people honking when the signal turns green at drivers like me who do not immediately take off. Personally I hate the wasted time I have to sit at red lights and, as your writers say, I am either combing my hair, reading a book, or cleaning out my purse. I rely on the person behind me to beep and let me know it's time to go. So thanks to all you honkers for letting me multitask while knowing I can count on you.

Diane Brauch

Los Altos

A Are you serious?

Q This is not sarcasm. I am serious. I always give them a friendly thank-you wave. In fact, I have told my friends that the person not paying attention appreciates their beep. I am surprised to hear I'm wrong.

Diane Brauch

A Well, some say you are, but others say you might not be. Let us proceed.

Q I just finished reading the blurbs on honking at green lights. My solution -- and it works -- is I just flash my lights and people look up. I don't need to honk. I use the same method when someone cuts in too close while driving on the freeway. It's not rage-inducing but lets the other driver know "heads up, jerk."

Penny Silva

San Jose

A No name-calling in Roadshow!

Q I wanted to comment on giving a gentle honk or beep at red lights and one of my pet peeves. With most intersections now being controlled by detector loops, my biggest gripe is when the person third or fourth in line at a red light is distracted and misses the green for a couple of seconds.

They are far enough back that they don't trip the detector loop. Usually they notice and are able to make it through the intersection, but everyone behind them has to wait another full cycle of lights, which could be several minutes at some busy intersections.

They are clueless that they have left a problem in their wake.

Justin Liu

Santa Clara

A I, too, feel your pain, but others have a different view on waiting at red lights.

Q I have another take on it. About two years ago I was stopped at the signal at Yerba Buena Road after the exit on southbound 101 waiting to make a left turn. The intersection is completely blind to the left due to a large concrete structure under the freeway.

For some reason, before charging into the intersection when the light turned green, I hesitated, and it was a good thing I did, or I might not be here today. Someone ran through the red light at high speed, followed by a second car!

I'm sure some people at red lights are clueless, but perhaps they are just making sure no idiot is going to run the red light.

Pam Casey

San Jose

A Fears of idiots -- aka red-light runners -- abound.

Q Since I began driving decades ago, I've observed the three-second rule of waiting before I drive after the lights turn green. It saved the lives of my two children sitting on the passenger side of our car as we drove to their grammar school. Had I not waited three seconds, an 18-wheeler truck would have creamed us as it roared through several seconds into its red light change. As a result, I just ignore any honking behind me!

Carolyn Canete

San Jose

A Ignorance can be bliss.

Q Yep, I get annoyed when someone waits too long at a red light because they aren't paying attention. But there are some intersections where it has saved lives to hesitate before entering, even after the light turned green.

We have witnessed many red-light runners at the freeway exit off 280 onto McLaughlin Avenue in San Jose. I always wait and look before I enter that intersection because people run the red from both directions. I would prefer to let someone behind me get annoyed than be T-boned because I didn't see that car not stopping.

JaNell Bosco

San Jose

A As traffic congestion builds, we are apt to see more red-light runners. Can we all agree on this? If someone dawdles as the red light turns green, a slight tap of the horn can be appropriate. But a long, hard blast isn't necessary.

Follow Gary Richards at Twitter.com/mrroadshow, look for him at Facebook.com/mr.roadshow or contact him at mrroadshow@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5335. The fax number is 408-288-8060.