Tell lies about climate change

Carbon is the most important element on earth. The main element of all living things, such as human bodies and all the food we eat, is carbon.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most essential element to make plants, such as trees and grass, grow. The CO2 level now on earth is 490 parts per million of our atmosphere, which is one part of carbon dioxide to 2,500 parts of our atmosphere, almost nothing. If the CO2 levels dropped to 180 parts per million, all plants would die, thus all humans would die.

During the so-called "glory years" here on hearth, about 100 million years ago, the CO2 level was 2,000 parts per million, five times greater than it is now. What happened? Plants grew much faster and larger, animals grew larger, some more than 80 feet long. The more carbon dioxide the better.

Why do so many politicians, bureaucrats and pseudo-scientists keep lying to us and making laws, fines and regulations to eliminate carbon and CO2? Money, big money.

They talk about climate change and global warming. What liars! If they scare the unknowing public and they create reasons for the big money regulators, politicians and bureaucrats to control our lives, property rights and our ability to create jobs, they will be all-powerful.

I have lived in West County for more than 83 years. Our climate and our water level in the Bay has not changed one bit.

Mike Vukelich

El Cerrito

Ironic medical situation


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Isn't it ironic that after the Palestinians tried so hard and unsuccessfully to prove that Israel poisoned Yasser Arafat, the granddaughter of Gaza's Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh is being treated in Israel?

Evie Groch

El Cerrito

Press ignoring conference

For about two weeks, the U.N. Climate Conference has been taking place in Warsaw, Poland. Yet, we are seeing virtually no coverage of this vitally important event in the daily press.

Amy Goodman has been broadcasting from the conference on Pacifica Radio: Reports from representatives of island nations of the devastation of their homes; eloquent appeals from young people to save the earth; and reports from scientists on the effects of climate change.

Several days ago, representative of 133 poor countries walked out of the conference -- protesting the refusal of the rich nations to discuss compensation for damage from climate change caused by the emission of greenhouse gasses.

Why are the newspapers not reporting on his daily? In whose interest is this information being censored?

Lydia Gans

Berkeley

Anti-Israel letters abound

After a brief hiatus, open season has commenced once again on "lets-dump-on-Israel," with a doubleheader on Nov. 15 by my good Berkeley neighbors, Carol Sanders and Larry Waldron.

Mercifully, nothing untoward or horrible, nor any injustice is happening anywhere else in the whole of the Middle East!

Iran? Nothing there that "ultimately threaten(s) the well-being of us all." Syria? Definitely nothing from there worth mentioning. The killing and brutality in Syria is even subsiding a bit. Why stir up long-past horrors? That should only be applied to Zionist injustices.

Egypt? Lebanon? Saudi Arabia? Libya? Yemen? Qatar? Nothing! This is all, in fact, fortunate, for if otherwise, the Journal would be so inundated by indignant letters from Sanders and Waldron that there would be no space in the whole of the Journal to print them all.

After Sanders kindly points out how Israel proponents "wring their hands over terminology," we get an excellent example of just this practice via Waldron's erudite parsing of the word "apartheid." It means "separateness." Well then, I very much regret I am in a state of apartheid with both of them.

Waldron advises us the number of Palestinian refuges is now at 750,000. It seems to go up with every communication to the letters page. Since the number of Jews robbed of property and expelled forcibly from nearly a dozen neighboring and far-flung Arab states is, perhaps, somewhat less than three quarters of a million, why certainly, we don't need to be concerned with that.

Sanders' implied conclusion that seemingly only Israel's enforced apartheid over its Palestinian citizens and the conquered territories ultimately threatens us all, is a subtle and well-nuanced rehash of that imperishable canard that Jews -- sorry, I mean Israelis -- are responsible for all of the world's horrors, wars and injustices.

Michael Solarz

Berkeley

Stop attacks on gun ownership

I strongly disagree with the Nov. 29 letter by Claire Baker, "Too many gun accidents." The story she quoted was not an "accident," but an unfortunate, intentional misuse of a gun by a suicidal individual.

Her letter was hoplophobic, anti-gun, anti-law-abiding gun owner, and anti-Second Amendment. She wrote, "I don't trust private gun ownership." I do trust private gun ownership by law-abiding citizens and, I expect, so do most citizens of this country.

Baker also wrote, "Private citizens owning guns add fear and negative capability to the culture," which is a slander of the millions of law-abiding citizens who responsibly exercise their individual Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms. That right has been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court for lawful purposes such as self-defense -- particularly important because the courts have consistently ruled the police are under no obligation to protect a specific individual -- hunting, target shooting in its various forms, and gun collecting.

There needs to be a stop to the constant attacks on Second Amendment rights. There are already ample laws on the books to deal with the criminal misuse of guns, criminal violence.

David R. Russell

Berkeley