Government as Santa Claus

No, I am not satisfied with the results of the presidential election.

When we were ignorant and irrational children, we believed in Santa Claus. Today, ignorant and irrational adults believe in a distorted form of Santa known as the government.

Even before President Theodore Roosevelt, progressives and government officials were indoctrinating the masses into believing the fantasy that government was a form of Santa Claus.

If you ask the ignorant and irrational whether they want a political candidate who said prosperity is created by taking risks and working hard versus a candidate who said prosperity is created by the government, they would select the latter candidate.

Unfortunately, we are there today because the ignorant and irrational people outnumber the knowledgeable and rational people.

Ray Greer

Danville

Forward thinking now will flourish

Oh yes, I am truly satisfied and relieved with President Barack Obama's re-election!

He will marshal our country together and avoid the fiscal cliff by getting a recalcitrant Congress to do its duty and extend the Bush tax cuts only for those who truly need it -- those making less than $250,000 a year. For example, someone earning $500,000 a year would pay a higher tax rate than presently only on income above $250,000.


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Corporations and the wealthy will finally do their part by patriotically acquiescing to let their tax rates return to the reasonable levels we had during the Clinton administration.

Democratic gains in the House and Senate, with a statesman such as Alan Grayson and consumer advocate Elizabeth Warren, will squelch the right wing's war on women and the poor.

Forward and progressive thinking will now flourish.

Ed Chainey

Richmond

Very satisfied that Obama was re-elected

I am very satisfied with the results of Tuesday's election.

I am thankful to President Obama for ending "don't ask, don't tell," supporting gay marriage, guaranteeing coverage for pre-existing conditions, supporting a woman's right to make her own decisions about her body.

I'm grateful to the president for signing into law the Lilly Ledbetter Equal Pay Act, making sure being a woman is no longer a pre-existing condition, ending the war in Iraq, and killing Osama bin Laden.

Courtney O'Brien

Martinez

Elated about President Obama's re-election

I'm extremely comfortable and elated with the re-election of President Obama.

All you have to know about the Republican Party is that its thundering voices of discord are the likes of Sean Hannity, Glenn Beck, Rush Limbaugh and Donald Trump. I'd never join that ideologically stained crowd.

Since Jan. 20, 2009, Republicans have regurgitated a persistent warning of our country's demise. But on Tuesday the American electorate rejected their demagogic rant.

Earlier this year, Beck perpetuated the GOP mantra, "If Obama wins a second term, America as we know it will cease to exist." That only tells me Beck and Republicans have no faith in the ability of our country to survive.

In the last four years, we have made enormous strides out of the economic abyss into which America plunged during President Bush's second term.

During the next four years, the economic rebound of the United States will be equally impressive.

Ronald Entwistle

San Pablo

Dismayed by lack of voters' wisdom

After digesting the outcomes of this election, I am dismayed by the lack of wisdom shown by voters across this nation. What disturbs me are the justifications expressed in defense of their votes.

The downside of this country's democratic process is that the votes of the uninformed count as much as those of us who study and understand the issues. At times, I wish there were a minimum intelligence test all voters had to pass, much like a driver's license exam.

To think that many of us really believe President Obama will be any more effective in getting Congress to do its job during the next four years borders on insanity. Albert Einstein defined this as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

I can understand the voters' mindset four years ago who really wanted change. Obama made that promise: We listened and then voted. But to do so again calls to mind the quote, "Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me."

My hope is future voters will read and understand the issues and not be "fooled again."

Dave Morris

Walnut Creek

Obama plans to destroy the U.S.

I am not satisfied with the election results. Here are my reasons why.

President Obama won, but what should you expect for his next term?

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has been negotiating with the United Nations on three issues:

  • The United Nations is going to impose a global tax of $266 per person, per year, on all Americans.

  • The United Nations is going to mandate that all guns owned by the people be confiscated.

  • Anyone who criticizes Islam will be charged with Islamophobia and criminally punished.

    The main action of removing all guns will create an impotent America, as our Second Amendment rights are removed.

    Obama is an Alinsky Democrat, which means he has an agenda to destroy America. He has set up 32 economic sectors with czars, which will dictate policy to all businesses in their sector.

    This will result in the nationalization of all businesses, making us a communist country.

    This is what we voted for, right?

    Don Crook

    Fremont

    America got fooled for a second time

    How does the old saying go: "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."

    Shame on you, America. You just got fooled again. You had the chance to take this country back and you blew it.

    Four more years of the same. One can only hope.

    More likely it'll be four years of even worse. President Obama backers reason that he inherited a mess from George W. Bush. Well, firefighters inherit fires, but they don't pour gasoline on them.

    Ray Green

    Hayward

    Republicans lost because they alienated the center

    The election results suggest that for the second consecutive election cycle, national Republicans' hopes for political dominance were dashed in large part by their own far-right candidates.

    In 2010 and 2012, the very conservative Republican primary electorate was determined to sweep out the party's centrists. The tea party wave that began in 2010 kept rolling early this year, again threatening the Republicans' chances for a Capitol Hill majority.

    In 2010, primary voters in Colorado, Missouri and Indiana selected tea party-backed conservatives, many who have alienated the party's moderate members, especially women.

    James R. Knight

    Berkeley

    Richmond voters defeated measure

    I was disappointed with local and national press coverage of Richmond's Measure N, a proposed tax on sugar-sweetened drinks.

    Ignoring the regressive nature of this tax, the mainstream press characterized the campaign as being a struggle between the "big bad" beverage lobby and the "noble underdogs," Councilman Jeff Ritterman and his entourage of dedicated middle-class activists.

    Ignored in this scenario were the targets of this regressive tax: the working class, minority communities and small local merchants.

    Ritterman repeatedly told the press there was no organized opposition until the beverage lobby arrived. The press never challenged this erroneous assertion. In fact, there was a lot of grass-roots opposition from the beginning.

    This opposition came from all segments of the community, especially the working-class elements, but was dismissed by the measure's proponents and the press, implicitly communicating class and racial bias by assuming the citizens of Richmond can't think for ourselves. In fact, we can and have, and two-thirds of the Richmond electorate demonstrated this Tuesday by soundly defeating this poorly conceived regressive tax.

    Charles T. Smith

    Richmond

    There is simply too much campaigning

    Mostly, I am OK with the election results.

    However, I wish American presidential terms were back to three four-year terms (12 years total).

    Seems a shame that about three years into a first term our presidents usually start campaigning for a second term. If the electorate then votes to re-elect the president for a second term, about three years into this final term, the president and Congress are labeled "lame ducks," in which not much important legislation is likely to pass.

    Do the math: Subtracting two years of lame-duck periods from two four-year terms (eight years) leaves only six years of real, undistracted presidency.

    I think there's too much campaigning and too much looking forward to campaigning.

    Claire J. Baker

    Pinole