A third measure to regulate how medical marijuana clinics operate in Los Angeles was placed on the May 21 ballot by the City Council on Tuesday, offered as a compromise to two other measures that are also going before voters.

City Attorney Carmen Trutanich urged the council to adopt the measure to resolve the marijuana issue after years of dispute and legal challenges.

"This will put in place what we had back in 2010," Trutanich said. "I believe this is the most sensible regulation we can come up with. This will give us the opportunity to regulate medical marijuana while making it accessible to those who need it."

Under the proposal, approved on a 10-3 vote, the original 135 dispensaries that registered with the city when an interim control ordinance was in place will be able to operate in the city.

Councilman Bill Rosendahl, who has admitted using marijuana as part of his cancer treatment, hailed the council action.

"This is a compromise, but it respects the people who have been paying their taxes and doing the best they can," Rosendahl said. "It allows people like me, with cancer, to have the health benefits of this drug."

Under the proposal, taxes on marijuana will be increased to $60 per 1,000 pounds sold. It restricts them from being located near schools or residential areas.

The two other proposals on the ballot would also allow the clinics, but with fewer restrictions on their locations.

In another action, the council approved placing a referendum on the ballot that would allow Los Angeles voter to express their views on the Citizens United decision of the Supreme Court that lifted restrictions on campaign contributions from corporations.

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