Very disappointed by Pride coverage

I was very disappointed that this paper made no mention of the Oakland Pride 2013 event held Sept. 1.

More than 50,000 people attended, and it was a proud day for the city of Oakland.

The paper should have run a story on this rather than focusing on the negative things that happen in Oakland.

Frank Pérez

Oakland

People are ignored by judicial decisions

In reading the Aug. 31 letter, "People voted; judges must not interfere," I thought of how often judges do overturn the votes of the people.

The people of Hayward voted in two different elections for the I-238 freeway and a judge overturned that vote. As a result, the people of Hayward have no freeway, but they do have a forest of trees at the I-580/238 interchange, and Hayward's downtown sports the best streetlights and new sidewalks in the county, not to mention the Loop that whips traffic through downtown faster than ever.

What ever happened to of the people, by the people and for the people?

Marlene Teel-Heim

Hayward

Paper should check readers on comics


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I agree with the recent writer that Mallard Fillmore has got to go. I have never seen anything so full of negativity and hatred that tries to pull us in with cute drawings. I will never read it again. And in view of the recent nearly $40 increase in annual cost for a delivered Tribune, unless it goes, so will I.

And what on earth is Lio? Makes no sense and sure isn't funny either.

Someone at the paper should check the subscriber demographic, please.

Inge Jordan

Emeryville

'Hometown Hero' has been just that

Kudos for the Hometown Hero feature. I particularly enjoyed the profile of the Rev. Michael Yoshii.

I came to know Rev. Yoshii several years ago when my son played basketball on a Buena Vista United Methodist Church-affiliated team. During various community events and tournaments, Rev. Yoshii would attend and was always approachable.

It was clear from my conversations with him that this was a man of the cloth far different from those I remember from my childhood. I was immediately impressed by his commitment to social justice and activism as part and parcel of his spirituality.

Such a message resonated with me as an adult, after a long history of practicing my faith in a Christian community that I considered to be hypocritical, judgmental and self-righteous.

Those very conversations with Rev. Yoshii directly led to my re-examining my beliefs about organized religion and reconsidering the potential role spirituality can play in one's life. I have since found a spiritual home and a welcoming community in a local parish, thanks to Rev. Yoshii.

The numerous efforts he has undertaken around the world to help others speak volumes of this man's character. With his acts of caring, hope, love and faith, Rev. Yoshii is truly a Hometown Hero.

Christopher Beach

Alameda

Right-wingers' war on labor

Propaganda works, especially decades of anti-labor propaganda from the overtly right-wing media and from stealth right-wing media.

The result's a bizarre form of class envy. The audience for right-wing media has been taught to resent unionized workers, who usually have good wages, good working conditions and good benefits.

The right-wing media keep asking, "Why should those lazy union members get high wages, good working conditions and good benefits when you don't?" It never frames, "Why don't you have the high wages, good working conditions and good benefits union members enjoy? Your parents and grandparents did."

The right-wingers have reverted to Victorian attitudes about poverty, namely, if you punish people enough, they'll stop being poor.

They grumble when poor people have cell phones, TVs, even refrigerators. They claim food stamps and Section 8 housing make it "too easy" to be poor.

I'm old enough to remember the War on Poverty. Contrary to right-wing mythology, it actually reduced poverty as long as it was fully in effect. In those days, we thought it shameful that Americans lived in slums or in rural shacks. Now, the conventional wisdom is that the poor deserve to be poor.

Dan Buckles

Concord