A reader is grateful format was restored

Thanks to the paper for putting Page 2 back the way it used to be. I really missed Tony Hicks' acerbic wit. I haven't been this happy since Le Cheval restaurant reappeared in downtown Oakland.

I know that change happens, but it's not always good. Thanks for listening to readers.

Janis Bishop

Oakland

A's earned right to get better coverage

The author of the Sept. 24 letter, "Even on top, A's get shorted on coverage," hit the nail on the head.

Where is the coverage of the A's? Sports section front page on Sept. 24 featured the Raiders' loss (again) and the America's Cup race (who cares?). I had to go to page 3 to read about the A's effort to win home-field advantage.

I'm a postseason ticketholder and I care about A's news.

Joyce Jacobson

Emeryville

Comics should not be allowed own facts

I don't mind if the paper carries comics on the right politically or on the left -- I only ask that they be clever, and are interestingly drawn.

Mallard Fillmore is neither. Plus, it is flat-out wrong in its assertion that the Arctic sea ice is growing. That is completely untrue. It is true that the sea ice in the Antarctic has been growing somewhat, though the land ice has been shrinking.

None of this contradicts global warming, however, as can be easily explained if you check out a number of scientific websites, including PBS.

If you want to be a climate change denier, you have that right, but you do not have the right to make up your own facts.

Bill Mayer

Berkeley

More armed people make the nation safer

The head of the NRA had it right: When good guys with guns enter the area of a mass shooting, the shooting stops.

Having good guys with guns in the area in the first place usually means no shooting, or very little shooting.

Many government employees are former soldiers who served this country with honor, and used many weapons in their career. We, as a nation, would be better served if each of these American heroes was afforded the same respect as retired local law enforcement people, and were allowed to carry whatever weapon they thought fit their life and work situation.

The curse of these mass shootings will continue to plague America so long as the liberal elite distrust all other Americans, and insist on their press to remove guns from "all those other people."

I, for one, trust most Americans. I would feel most safe in a large gathering where most of the people were carrying concealed weapons. One or two crazy folks could do little damage to such a group. (Think it does not exist? Try a police or sheriff convention.)

People who want guns taken away do not trust their fellow Americans, period.

Richard Neveln

Alameda

Minimum wage can benefit the economy

Thomas Sowell's recent (online) column about the effects of minimum wage laws invites some comments.

He says that a fundamental principle of economics is people tend to buy more when the price is lower and less when the price is higher; thus people will lose their jobs if the minimum wage increases. This principle has to be qualified to draw those conclusions:

First; it ignores income. If income also rises, buyers may end up buying more if the income effect dominates the price effect.

Second; it ignores expectations. If a price rise generates expectations of further rises, people may buy more now to avoid paying more later.

Third; it ignores other prices. If other prices rise even more than the price of the good or service in question, the said good or service may become cheaper.

Fourth; an increase in the minimum wage may make a job more valuable and, by reducing turnover, lower the costs of hiring and training new workers.

So viewed, an increase in the minimum wage is beneficial not only for workers, but also for employers and the economy in general.

Theodore Haniotis

Berkeley