STANFORD -- Now that was sweet.

Senior All-American Chiney Ogwumike and her Stanford accomplices played one of their most complete games of the season Sunday to roll into the Elite Eight.

Ogwumike had 29 points, 15 rebounds, three assists and two steals as the second-seeded Cardinal rocked No. 3 Penn State 82-57 in the NCAA women's regional semifinals at Maples Pavilion.

Stanford (32-3) will attempt to advance to its sixth Final Four in seven years Tuesday night against North Carolina, which stunned top-seeded South Carolina 65-58 in the second game at Maples.

Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer predicted it will take another massive effort to get past the Tar Heels and into the Final Four next weekend in Nashville, Tenn.

"We're not going to let any lull happen," fifth year senior Mikaela Ruef promised.

The Cardinal has been on a mission since getting upset in the Pac-12 Conference tournament semifinals, a defeat that cost the team a No. 1 seeding in the NCAAs. Behind the encouragement of Ogwumike, the players have redoubled their effort for March Madness.

It showed Sunday in front of a sellout crowd of 6,700.

It showed with a patient offense that didn't force the ball inside to Ogwumike, who averages 26.5 points a game. It showed on defense where freshman guard Lili Thompson held the Big Ten's all-time leading scorer, Maggie Lucas, to six points, none in the second half.

It showed underneath the basket where the smaller Cardinal out-rebounded the Nittany Lions 41-33.

"It's the first time this season that we jumped on a team," said Ruef, who had 11 points, 15 rebounds, five assists and two steals.

After trailing by four points midway through the first half, Stanford went on a 14-0 run over 5 minutes 19 seconds to lead 33-23. Ogwumike, who has 25 double-double performances in 35 games this season, scored three times during the run.

But it was Stanford's energetic second efforts that left Penn State (24-8) deflated.

Perhaps no one was more downcast than Lucas, whose collegiate finale didn't go as envisioned. The Penn State guard made 3 of 14 shots, and missed all five from 3-point range. Lucas, who averaged 21.5 points a game this season, was held to her season-low output.

"I feel like they stopped looking for her after a while," said Thompson, who added 11 points and 3 steals.

VanDerveer could not have been happier.

"Maggie Lucas hasn't had six points since she was in third grade," the coach said.

A year after losing in the Sweet 16 to Georgia 61-59, the Cardinal dominated as junior guard Amber Orrange had 18 points on 7 of 11 shooting to add to Penn State's misery.

The Cardinal won for the 16th time at home this season without a loss.

Penn State started a 6-foot-5 center and two 6-3 forwards, making it one of the few teams to match Stanford's height this season. That size caused the Cardinal problems early in the game before a defensive adjustment changed the game's complexion.

Credit Ogwumike, who described herself as an afterthought. With a straight face. But the prohibitive top overall draft pick in next month's WNBA draft got physical underneath the basket to try to shut down Penn State's inside threats.

"She's not going to let people push her around," Ruef said.

Not with a chance to reach another Final Four.

North Carolina 65, South Carolina 58: Freshman Diamond DeShields had 19 points despite being forced to leave the game because of injuries as the Tar Heels (27-9) held off their regional rival.

South Carolina joined fellow Southeastern Conference member Tennessee as the two top-seeded schools to get eliminated Sunday.

"They did what most people thought was not possible," coach Dawn Staley said of North Carolina.

Freshman forward Stephanie Mavunga added 13 points and 9 rebounds for the Tar Heels. Alaina Coates had 22 points and 11 rebounds to pace the Gamecocks (29-4).

Contact Elliott Almond at 408-920-5865. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/elliottalmond.

Tuesday's game
STANFORD Regional
Championship
Stanford (32-3) vs. North
Carolina (27-9), 6 p.m., ESPN

INSIDE
Maryland stuns No. 1 seed
Tennessee. PAGE 5