BUDGET AT A GLANCE

K-12 SCHOOLS

Increases by 8.4 percent funds for transitional kindergarten through 12th grade, to $75.9 billion. Outlines a 30-year plan for the state, teachers and school districts to increase contributions to pay for teacher pensions. Finishes repaying $6.2 billion the state previously borrowed by delaying payments to school districts.

HIGHER EDUCATION

Increases by roughly 5 percent funds for UC and CSU systems, as proposed in January -- about $142 million each. Calls for tuition freeze, which began in 2012, to continue through 2016-17. Boosts by at least 10 percent funding to the California community colleges, whose state appropriation is tied to a constitutional guarantee also covering K-12 schools, and gives them $50 million to expand career technical education programs.

TRANSPORTATION

The revised budget reflects a net reduction of $21.8 million from Gov. Jerry Brown's January budget -- in part because 195 state-employed engineers, designers and construction oversight experts are being phased out. The workers are paid out of diminishing funding sources, such as the federal stimulus money approved by Congress in 1999.

HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES

Adds $1.2 billion for unanticipated increase in numbers of traditional Medi-Cal enrollees. Adds $107.9 million in 2013-14 and $134.4 in 2014-15 for In-Home Support Services. Adds $35 million in 2013½'14 and $95.2 million in 2014½'15 to CalWORKS, the state's welfare-to-work program.

PARKS AND ENVIRONMENT

No parks will be closed; no entrance fees will be raised. Adds $121 million to Natural Resources Agency budget in drought-related spending, including $66 million to combat fires this summer. Adds $18.1 million to help local water agencies, move water around the state and pay for more publicity to remind residents to save water

COURTS

After years of budget bloodletting, California's courts received a $160 million bump in funding in Brown's new budget plan -- although with some strings attached and a stern warning that the state's judicial leaders need to tighten spending further. The revised budget includes $60 million more than proposed in January, tying the increase to a two-year plan calling for several reforms, including extracting more contributions from court employees for pension costs.