This is a sampling from Bay Area News Group's Political Blotter blog. Read more and post comments at www.ibabuzz.com/politics.

June 25

Their East Bay Districts overlap, but Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan and state Sen. Mark DeSaulnier certainly weren't seeing eye to eye at Monday's Assembly Transportation Committee hearing.

DeSaulnier, D-Concord, was there to speak on behalf of his SB544, which would require the California Department of Education to apply to the Department of Motor Vehicles for creation of a specialized license plate program to generate funds for school violence prevention programs.

The problem is, DeSaulnier -- who chairs the Senate Transportation Committee -- earlier this year helped push through a resolution, SR28, that puts a moratorium on new license plate types until a task force made up of California Highway Patrol, DMV and local police can issue a report by July 2015 "on license plate designs appropriate for traffic safety and effective law enforcement in today's environment."

And that resolution essentially put the kibosh on Buchanan's AB49, which would require the Department of Health Care Services to apply to DMV for a special license plate promoting breast cancer awareness -- what supporters call the "pink plate" bill. AB49 now languishes in the Senate Rules Committee.


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"Could you please explain to me why you should not have to follow the same rules as everyone else, and why this plate and any other should not be subject to the pending results of the study?" Buchanan, D-Alamo, asked DeSaulnier on Monday. "Because it seems to me that when we write a bill that kills one, it should apply to everybody, especially the author of that resolution."

The difference, DeSaulnier replied, is that "the full-plate pink plate had a problem, in my conversations with the CHP" — police were concerned that the fully colored plate might be hard to distinguish from other states' plates, especially under twilight conditions. His school-violence prevention plate, he said, merely has a logo on one side, not a fully different color.

But Buchanan insists SR28 applies to all specialty license plates. And "if we're going to pass a resolution that clearly states it applies to all specialty plate types... we should be applying that equally to all license plates and not making special carve-outs," she said.

Replied DeSaulnier: "If someone comes together with a plate that complies with our rules then it will get out of our committee."

"Right now, my opinion is, your plate does not," he told Buchanan. "In my discussions with CHP, they had some questions, so that's why we're doing the study. ... My whole difficulty with your plate was whether public safety could see or not."

Buchanan held her ground. "I believe for us to approve a bill that's in conflict with an existing Senate resolution that came out of the Senate Transportation Committee is not responsible," she said. "I think that if they want to change it, it should be changed first."

The Assembly Transportation committee voted 10-3 to advance DeSaulnier's bill, which is now pending before the Assembly Education Committee.

June 25

Contrary to what was reported here last week, state Senate Majority Leader Ellen Corbett has not yet run out of time to request a recount of her apparent defeat in this month's primary election for the 15th Congressional District.

After Contra Costa County's results updated on Tuesday afternoon, Corbett, D-Hayward, trails Republican candidate Hugh Bussell of Livermore by 430 votes in their battle to finish second after Rep. Eric Swalwell. The second-place finisher, of course, will go on to face Swalwell, D-Dublin, in November's general election.

A spokesman for Alameda County Registrar Tim Dupuis had said Friday that candidates have five calendar days after the election results are certified -- which Dupuis did Friday -- in which to request a recount. But Dupuis said Wednesday that because this district spans two counties, candidates actually have five days starting on the 29th day following the election; the 29th day will be July 2, so a recount can be requested up until July 7.

Dupuis said Corbett has not yet requested a recount. Corbett hasn't returned several calls over the past two weeks seeking comment on her intentions.