On Dec. 12, 2006, I toured the island of Curacao in the south Caribbean, the population of which is about 130,000 multinational peoples. There I saw what must be the seventh wonder of the world. Or maybe the eighth, I don't know.

This wonder is an electricity and water-desalinization utility. It is the only generating plant on the island, has been in operation in the current form since 1947 and provides the entire island's electricity and fresh water needs. The plant snuggles up against the sea. But no telltale polluting smoke is emanating from its stacks — only white steam vapor.

This plant has generated electricity 24/7, 365 days a year using giant turbines coupled to generators, the former placed in the average range of the sea's coastal tidal flows. The bypass seawater is then routed to the adjoining plant for desalinization. How simple, how ingenious! This plant is totally efficient, cost effective and environmentally symbolic.

So, why don't we have this technology in the U.S.? Because profit is king?

While the U.S. techno/bureaucrats may say this technology is not viable, they need only talk to their Curacaon counterparts for the scoop. In fact, these same technologies are already online in the U.S. in the form of giant turbine/impellers and generators located in our many hydroelectric utilities, none of which are on our seacoasts.

Published costs of energy sources by PG&E indicate hydroelectric power is only about one-third the cost of any other available energy source.


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With this source, battery-powered vehicles, extraction of the hydrogen atom and reduced global warming would all be possible.

Come join the cabaret, World.

Randy Smart

San Leandro

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