MAKING THE GRADE

Here is how the Raiders (3-5) graded in their 49-20 loss Sunday against the Philadelphia Eagles (4-5):

Passing offense: Many of the offensive numbers have to be thrown out simply because they were a matter of stat-building yards built because of an up-tempo opponent which had a big lead. Terrelle Pryor's final numbers (22 of 41 for 288 yards with two interceptions) weren't as good as they looked. When the Raiders needed to keep pace with the Eagles, Pryor couldn't find an open receiver then often held the ball and scrambled -- sometimes too late to matter. Rod Streater's 66-yard catch and run only netted a field goal for the first score. Grade: C-minus.

Philadelphia Eagles’ starting quarterback Nick Foles (9) throws a touchdown pass against the Oakland Raiders in the first quarter at O.co Coliseum in
Philadelphia Eagles' starting quarterback Nick Foles (9) throws a touchdown pass against the Oakland Raiders in the first quarter at O.co Coliseum in Oakland, Calif., on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)

Rushing offense: Another example where stats lie. Rashad Jennings was a more than adequate fill-in for Darren McFadden (15 rushes for 102 yards, 6.8 yards per carry) and had an 8-yard touchdown run. Pryor added 94 yards rushing, although much of it were on designed pass plays where he took off and ran. In all, a 33-carry, 210-yard game -- usually enough to win -- accomplished nothing close to that. Grade: C-minus.

Pass defense: Philadelphia quarterback Nick Foles threw seven touchdown passes only because Chip Kelly pulled the plug with 9 minutes left and didn't let him go for an NFL record of eight. Foles' 158.3 quarterback rating is perfect in the league's rating system, and he was something near that against a defense that generated no pressure, didn't make plays and looked as if it was playing eight defenders against 11 offensive players. Foles (22 of 28, 406 yards) had more touchdown passes than incompletions. Grade: F.

Rush defense: The strength of the Raiders was anything but that against the Eagles, bending, breaking and yielding. LeSean McCoy (12 rushes, 44 yards) was held relatively in check, but Bryce Brown had seven rushes for 54 yards with a long run of 32 yards. The Eagles' second scoring drive came almost exclusively on the ground. The Eagles averaged 5.3 yards per carry against a team that came in giving up 3.6 and hadn't surrendered a run of more than 19 yards in seven games. Grade: D.

Special teams: The Eagles simply kicked away from the more dangerous Taiwan Jones in favor if Jeremy Stewart (two returns, 43 yards). Jacoby Ford had three fair catches on punts. So much for the explosion on returns. The Raiders gave up a 41-yard kickoff return to Brandon Boykin and a 32-yard punt return to DeSean Jackson. Sebastian Janikowski converted both of his field-goal attempts (24 and 53 yards). Marquette King had a pedestrian 36.6 net punting with a touchback and one inside the 20. Grade: C.

Coaching: After talking all week as if the Eagles presented no surprises, the Raiders looked bothered, confused and bewildered on defense. They were on their heels from the outset. Coach Dennis Allen said all manner of pass rush strategies were employed, but it sure looked like a lot of "coverage" and even then the Raiders couldn't keep receivers in front. Offensively, the Raiders in the first half couldn't come up with a way to consistently move the ball against an Eagles defense which under Kelly had seen plenty of read-option stuff before. The coaching staff was as culpable for the debacle as the players. Grade: F.

-- JERRY McDONALD