The son of a Cal alum and coach, Eddie Miller can't even remember the first time he attended a sporting event on the Berkeley campus.

"I was so young, probably two years old and on my dad's shoulders at one of the games," said Miller, whose father, Ed, is a longtime track and field coach at Cal and former NCAA decathlon champion. "I've been to hundreds of games there "... football, basketball, track meets, whatever.

"All I knew was Cal. My dad kind of brainwashed me."

Miller will be back on campus tonight in an unfamiliar role -- the opposition.

Three years after beginning his college career as a walk-on at Cal, Miller and the UC Davis Aggies (3-4) visit Haas Pavilion to take on the Golden Bears (3-2) in a 7:30 p.m. nonconference game.

"I'm a little anxious, but mostly excited to go back and see those guys, like Harper (Kamp) and Coach (Mike) Montgomery that were a big part of my life for my two years."

Miller, who was the Player of the Year in the Bay Valley Athletic League as a senior at Antioch High in 2007, played in 15 games over two seasons at Cal.

After the 2008-09 season, convinced he had little opportunity to play behind the likes of Jerome Randle and Patrick Christopher, he conferred with Montgomery and decided to transfer.

"It was a very difficult decision. "... Coach Montgomery is a phenomenal coach," Miller said. "But making the decision to come here was a good choice. The coaches have given me the chance of a lifetime."


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Miller is averaging 8.0 points and 3.6 rebounds per game as a starting guard for the Aggies and is coming off a career-high 20-point effort in a victory over Seattle.

His goal tonight?

"Hopefully play well," he said. "It will be the first time rooting against Cal or playing against them."

  • Freshman wing Alex Rossi has yet to play because of a nagging groin injury, and Montgomery said it's possible he could be redshirted this season.

    "Not sure he's going to make it back," Montgomery said. "We're going to try to get him back. We're not sure that's going to work. He can't get down in a stance, he can't really move, and when he starts doing stuff it gets pretty painful."