ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Commissioner Bud Selig reacted with a profanity Thursday when asked for an update on the A's bid to build a ballpark in San Jose.

When a reporter said he was obliged to ask about the A's ongoing battle with the Giants over territorial rights in the South Bay, Selig somewhat playfully responded, "Yeah, I'd feel very badly if you didn't ask it. You aren't going to get a (expletive) answer."

The commissioner's response elicited laughter from the room full of reporters.

It's now been three years since Selig appointed a blue ribbon panel to help find a Bay Area ballpark solution for the A's. Still, when asked by another reporter off camera, Selig indicated an end is in sight.

"I know people say 'Gee, it should be easy to do,'" Selig said. "Well, the more they've gotten into it, the more complicated it's gotten. But we're headed for resolution."

Speaking at baseball's owners meeting, Selig was asked

There was no update on the situation in Northern California, where Oakland wants to build a ballpark in San Jose -- an area that is part of the San Francisco Giants' territory.

"I know people say 'Gee, it should be easy to do,'" Selig said. "Well, the more they've gotten into it, the more complicated it's gotten. But we're headed for resolution."

Yeah I'd feel very badly if you didn't ask it ... You aren't going to get a (expletive) answer, but ... ."


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Selig knows he can't answer the question, because the owners who will decide this issue one way or another haven't coalesced to provide him one. And the questioner, Eric Fisher of the Sports Business Journal, knows it as well. It's not an unfair question, but it is one that is ultimately aimed at the wrong person.

So Selig dropped the F-bomb on the question, not on the topic. The question only puts him in a jam, so he pungently rejected the question. The issue? Still no further along than it has been, and it won't be until the A's either put a shovel in the ground, the Giants threaten lawyers, or the other 28 owners decide this is an issue worthy of their care.

ROSEMONT, Ill. (AP) -- Bud Selig was on hand when the Miami Marlins played their first regular-season game in their swanky new ballpark in April. The commissioner provided a glowing review of the $634 million project and boldly declared that opposition to the facility would fade away within five years.