Jason Kelce, who was with Riley Cooper when he shouted a racial slur at a Kenny Chesney concert last month, did not defend his teammate and friend on Thursday. The Philadelphia Eagles center said he was "embarrassed" to be associated with the incident, but Kelce said he did not think Cooper was a racist.

"Riley was my friend before the fact, and he's still my friend and teammate going forward," Kelce said. "Anybody that really knows him knows he's not a racist. ... But sometimes he can get a little bit out of control. We were both pretty intoxicated on that day."

Cooper, Kelce and several other Eagles, including coach Chip Kelly, were at the concert at Lincoln Financial Field. During one song, Chesney brought the Eagles, most of whom were white, up on stage.

Later on, Cooper had an altercation, he said, with an African American security guard. In the video, first posted on Crossingbroad.com, Kelce is briefly shown placing his hand on an obviously agitated Cooper. The receiver then said, "I will jump that fence and fight every n-- here."

Kelce said he didn't recall hearing what Cooper had said. "To be honest, I don't really recall the whole incident and what was said," Kelce said.

Browns: The NFL is standing by Browns owner Jimmy Haslam. With Haslam embroiled in a legal scandal involving his family-owned truck-stop business, commissioner Roger Goodell expressed his confidence in Cleveland's owner and said the league has no plans to intervene or discipline him at this point.

Goodell visited Cleveland's training camp on Thursday to launch a program between the league and Pop Warner with USA Football's Heads Up Football Program. After a clinic with young players, Goodell said he's satisfied with Haslam's handling of the federal investigation at Pilot Flying J, and said the league is proud to be associated with its newest owner.

"Jimmy Haslam is a man of great integrity," Goodell said. "We're proud to have him as an owner in the NFL and think he's going to be a great owner for the Cleveland Browns and their fans."

Female official: A woman who could become the NFL's first female official is training at New Orleans Saints training camp this week. Sarah Thomas, who lives near Jackson, Miss., is a former college basketball player who started officiating high school games at age 23 and says she never dreamed then that she could become a candidate to officiate NFL games.

Now 40 years old, she has been officiating college football in Conference USA since 2007, is a member of the NFL's Officiating Development Program and a finalist to become a permanent NFL official.

Vikings: The NFL denied DeMarcus Love's appeal and announced that the offensive tackle has been suspended without pay for four games for violating the NFL's policy on performance-enhancing drugs. "I was shocked," Love said. "I've never cheated, and I never will, intentionally."

Dolphins: Wide receivers Brian Hartline and Mike Wallace continue to be slowed by injuries, though both said they hope to play in Sunday's Hall of Fame Game.

Seahawks: Coach Pete Carroll says wide receiver Percy Harvin faces a long rehab process after having surgery to repair his injured hip. Carroll said the surgery performed in New York went "very well" but that the team doesn't have a timetable for his recovery.

Panthers: Carolina released veteran offensive lineman Geoff Hangartner.

Chiefs: The team signed cornerback Kamaal McIlwain and former Cal offensive tackle Mike Tepper.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.