The NFL's concussion settlement might not have settled anything.

On Wednesday, two former Super Bowl champions -- Troy Aikman and John Lynch, now Fox Sports broadcasters -- contended the league has more work to do.

Aikman wants the NFL to divulge more details about what it knew regarding the long-term impact of repeated blows to the head, and when it knew it. Lynch said he expects even more litigation after the league tentatively agreed last week to pay out $765 million to a group of former players.

"What I'm happy about is that there are players that need it (the money) and need it now, and they're going to be taken care of," Lynch, a former Stanford star, said. "But I think the notion that this is done now and we can move on is not really the reality. A new lawsuit was filed today, and from talking with Scott (Fujita) I think there are more to come."

It wasn't immediately clear which lawsuit Lynch was referring to, though one was filed Sunday in New Orleans. Former NFL players Jimmy Williams, Rich Mauti, Jimmy Keyes and Nolan Franz claim the league hid information about the dangers of brain injury.

While neither Lynch nor Aikman were part of the original lawsuit, both know a thing or two about concussions.

Lynch was one of the league's hardest hitting safeties in Tampa Bay and Denver from 1993 through 2007. Though Lynch has said he was never officially diagnosed with a concussion, he told a Tampa columnist in 2011 that there were times he was "woozy" and asked a teammate to take his spot closer to the line of scrimmage while he recovered.


Advertisement

Aikman won three Super Bowls with the Cowboys during the 1990s, but his 12-year career ended prematurely in part because of repeated concussions.

Today, Lynch and Aikman say they feel "great" and have shown no symptoms of long-term damage.

  • NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell took issue with the notion that the league's $765 million settlement with former players is a paltry sum compared with the sport's revenues. "This is a significant amount of money," he said. "The plaintiffs also agreed it was an appropriate amount. The mediator felt it was an appropriate amount." Goodell was making his first public comments since the settlement was announced last week.

    Jets: Rookie Geno Smith will start at quarterback in the opener at home Sunday against Tampa Bay. The team finally confirmed what had been expected since Mark Sanchez injured his right shoulder in a preseason game against the Giants on Aug. 24.

    "They'll try to rattle my cage," Smith said of the Buccaneers. " ... They've got a rookie quarterback and they'll want to hit me and get me off my game, but I expect those things. And I look forward to it."

    Bills: Rookie quarterback EJ Manuel will be ready to open the season against the New England Patriots, after all, coach Doug Marrone said. Manuel's status had been in question after he had what the team called a "minor procedure" on his left knee on Aug. 18.

    Patriots: Star tight end Rob Gronkowski is making steady progress from his forearm and back operations but isn't saying if he expects to play in New England's opener Sunday at Buffalo.

    Broncos: Cornerback Champ Bailey won't play in Denver's opener against the Baltimore Ravens on Thursday night because of a sprained left foot.

    Rams: St. Louis waived outside linebacker Jo-Lonn Dunbar rather than wait for the second-leading tackler from last season to serve a four-game suspension to open the season. But coach Jeff Fisher said there's always a chance the Rams could re-sign Dunbar.