PORTLAND -- Robin Lopez is the perfect player on the perfect team in the perfect town.

"They've welcomed me with open arms," the former Stanford star said of his first season as starting center for the Portland Trail Blazers. "It's a weird place, weird as hell. And I'm weird as hell. So it goes hand in hand."

Blazers coach Terry Stotts said he's never worked with a player quite like the 25-year-old, who identifies himself on his Twitter profile as "The Screech Powers of the NBA," a nod to the nerdy character from the old sitcom, "Saved by the Bell."

"There's not very many people like him," Stotts said. "Keep Portland Weird ... there aren't too many towns that have that slogan. Portland's a perfect fit for him and vice-versa."

Portland Trail Blazers center Robin Lopez gives a puzzled look after being called for a foul during the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game against
Portland Trail Blazers center Robin Lopez gives a puzzled look after being called for a foul during the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Sacramento Kings in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014. The Kings won 123-119.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Lopez has been just as good a fit for the Blazers, who took the NBA by storm by winning 22 of their first 26 games and are 28-9 overall.

The 7-footer averages 10.3 points and a career-best 8.4 rebounds, but his value extends beyond the numbers.

"Guys love playing with him," Stotts said. "He's selfless. The most important thing to him is the team. He's very much a competitor and that's rubbed off on the entire team."

Lopez's role is pretty much the same as it was during his Stanford days, when twin brother Brooke was considered the more skilled offensive player and Robin was content to stay in the trenches. His frontcourt running mate now is power forward LaMarcus Aldridge, who is gaining momentum as an MVP candidate.

"Do the dirty work, provide some interior defense, get some rebounds, take some pressure off LaMarcus," Lopez said of his assignments. "It's nothing different, really."

That has directly translated to greater production by Aldridge, who is averaging 23.6 points and 11 rebounds.

"He'll keep one or two guys off the boards and it allows other guys, like LaMarcus, to get rebounds," Stotts said. "More than the Xs and Os and what's happening on the court, it's the chemistry he's provided with LaMarcus."

Lopez came to Portland in a trade from New Orleans and said he knew during September workouts that the team had the makings of something special. The Blazers, also featuring Oakland native and reigning NBA Rookie of the Year Damian Lillard, began clicking well before the season began.

"It doesn't always (translate), but the way we were playing on the floor," Lopez said, "that was something different, that was something unique."

Few players demand the description "unique" the way Lopez does.

He collects comic books, loves the 1985 movie, "Goonies," and gained attention last month for yanking an "Afro" wig off Pistons mascot "Hooper," whom Lopez decided was making fun of his hairstyle.

"That was totally on him," Lopez said. "That was self-defense on my part."

Lopez entertains Twitter followers with a range of eclectic notions. In recent posts:

  • He campaigned for the "mass burning of sleeved NBA jerseys."

  • Proposed a Tim Burton holiday film with Jack sliding down the Christmas tree (not the beanstalk) amid re-animated roast turkeys.

  • Complained that it's "hard to play Marvel vs. Capcom and eat Taco Bell with a cat on your chest."

  • Identified his favorite TV crush as Lilith Crane -- Bebe Neuwirth's character from the sitcom, "Fraser."

    Stotts applauds the fact that Lopez has hobbies and interests beyond the court, and said his teammates are respectful.

    "He's different, but in a very good way," Stotts said. "He has a good heart. He wants to do the right thing. He's a good teammate, which is really one of our strengths."

    Follow Jeff Faraudo on Twitter at twitter.com/JeffFaraudo.