NEW YORK -- While Ray Guy had to wait 23 years for election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, linebacker Derrick Brooks and offensive tackle Walter Jones were selected in their first year of eligibility.

Along with Guy, the longtime Raider who became the first punter elected, Brooks and Jones join defensive end Michael Strahan, receiver Andre Reed, defensive back Aeneas Williams and defensive end Claude Humphrey in the class of 2014.

The announcement was made Saturday at the NFL Honors award show. Induction will be Aug. 1 in Canton, Ohio.

According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, former 49ers owner Eddie DeBartolo, ex-Raiders receiver Tim Brown, former Stanford safety John Lynch, Morten Andersen and Tony Dungy were eliminated from consideration in the first reduction ballot from 15 to 10 by the Hall of Fame selection committee.

Former 49ers defensive lineman Charles Haley, the only player with five Super Bowl rings (two with the 49ers) made the cut to 10, but he, Jerome Bettis, Kevin Greene, Marvin Harrison and Will Shields were eliminated in the reduction to five.

Brooks was the cornerstone of a Bucs defense that led the league in 2002 and 2005, and the NFC five times. He was The Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year when Tampa Bay won its only Super Bowl after the 2002 season.

The linebacker never missed a game in his 14 seasons and averaged a remarkable 146 tackles. Six of his 25 interceptions were returned for touchdowns, including three in 2002.

Seattle certainly got a winner when it moved up to the No. 6 spot in the 1997 draft to take Jones. He immediately provided blindside protection for Warren Moon and quickly became the first Seahawks lineman to earn a Pro Bowl spot. He was one of the chief road graders who helped Shaun Alexander rush for 266 yards in a 2001 game -- the fourth-highest total in NFL history -- and then rush for a team-record 1,880 yards and 28 TDs in his MVP season in 2005.

"Coming into the league all I wanted to do was get here, and ... say I could play this game," Jones said. "For me to be here now, and for my team that I started with and finished with, to be here in the Super Bowl is just like the icing on the cake."

Strahan set the NFL record for sacks in a single season, getting 221/2 in 2001. Younger teammates said he taught them how to work to become NFL players, and he walked away from the NFL after winning the Super Bowl in February 2008.

"It's hard to find guys with everything, but this guy had everything. size, speed, power, toughness, endurance, motor, smarts, leadership, heart, love for the game, but what I admired most about Michael was his pride," Giants general Jerry Reese said. "No matter what the circumstances were, when he walked out on that field on Sunday, he was going to give it ALL to you. There aren't many guys who can say that."

Reed came out of little Kutztown (Pa.) University and played his first 15 seasons with Buffalo, getting to four Super Bowls, but never winning one. His final season was with Washington. His 951 career receptions are third in league history, highlighted by nine consecutive seasons of 50-plus catches.

Long before people spoke about yards after the catch, Reed was doing it. He finished with 13,198 yards and 87 touchdowns.

"Having to wait this long for him is a sin, but the bottom line is he's in and that's what counts," former Bills quarterback Jim Kelly said of Reed's nine-year wait to get into the Hall.

A walk-on at Southern University, Williams was a shutdown cornerback in his 14 NFL seasons, the first 10 with the Cardinals and the last four with the Rams. He had 55 career interceptions, getting at least one in every season except his last. He had five or more in picks in six seasons, with nine being his best in 1994.

Williams spent his last four seasons with St. Louis. He started at cornerback for the Rams in the 2001 Super Bowl and played safety in his final two seasons.

The Hall of Fame doors finally opened for Humphrey on his 28th year of eligibility and his fifth as a finalist. The durable six-time Pro Bowl pick had 122 career sacks in 14 seasons with the Falcons and Eagles, who acquired him after a brief retirement in the 1978 season.

"I never really gave up hope," said Humphrey, whose only regret was his wife died in July and didn't get to see his election. "I always figured there was a place for me here."