OAKLAND — To illustrate how rare it is to see Adonal Foyle charting back-to-back double-doubles, consider this: In the 81/4 years since the deep-thinking center debuted with the Warriors, he has posted double-digit numbers in both points and rebounds in consecutive games just four times.

During that same time span, there have been five total eclipses of the sun.

How ironic, then, that while Foyle is playing his best ball of the season, it might not be enough to avoid being pushed into the shadows by the re-emergence of the Phoenix Suns.

Foyle totaled 22 points, 25 rebounds and six blocks in victories over Sacramento and Charlotte last week, setting aseason-high in points on both evenings. Gone, for the most part, were the passes fumbled out of bounds. They were replaced by dunks, layups and even a nice up-fake to draw a foul on Bobcats star Emeka Okafor.

Asked to explain the surge, Foyle paid tribute to point guard Baron Davis: "He's been making my life easy."

But Foyle bristled a bit at the notion that this is anything new, his 4.6 career scoring average notwithstanding.

"I think the easy thing would be to say, 'Oh, somehow the offensive moves metastasized overnight.' But the truth is that they've been there," Foyle said. "Confidence breeds confidence. Given the opportunity to make moves, I know I can do it. ... BD, being such a good point guard, he's going to keep looking for you once you've been successful down low.


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Even so, as the fifth offensive option out of Golden State's starting five, getting double-figure scoring from Foyle is a bit like finding a $20 bill in those pants you just pulled out of the dryer. Troy Murphy acknowledged Tuesday that when the Warriors get those kinds of numbers from Foyle, "we've got to win those games."

"Adonal needs to keep it going," Jason Richardson said. "We need him to rebound, and when he gets the ball we need him to keep scoring."

The question is, when Davis searches the low block tonight, will he find Foyle there, or on the bench? When the Suns and Warriors met for the first time this season, Nov. 12 in Phoenix, Foyle played just the first four minutes. He never got off the bench again as coach Mike Montgomery attempted to match Phoenix's ridiculously small lineup with five wing players of his own. It made no difference as the Suns rolled to a 101-86 trouncing.

"I can only control the minutes I play on the floor, the minutes I'm given," Foyle said. "I try very hard not to think about whether I play 5 (minutes) or I play 10 or I play 20. I try to just be as productive as I can be in those minutes."

Part of the problem is that with Amare Stoudemire, Phoenix's only true pivot man, sidelined due to injury, there's no natural matchup for Foyle.

"They cause a lot of problems with their lineup," Montgomery said. "They can get five perimeter-type players on the floor and not give up very much in terms of the other parts of the game. ... Playing small is certainly one option, but maybe that's playing right into their hands."

Davis said he expects to try and establish an inside presence early on tonight. However, to make a "regular" lineup work against the Suns, Foyle knows he needs to keep up his production level, especially on the glass. In three games against Phoenix last year, Foyle averaged 14 boards a game.

"We have to kill them on the glass," Foyle said.