Film should be shot here, not in Louisiana

I read with interest that a new movie is about to begin filming, about De La Salle High School and it's record-setting football team, with Jim Caviezel lined up to play Coach Bob Ladouceur.

I thought this would be very exciting for the current De La Salle students, team, and fans. Unfortunately, the movie is going to be filmed in Louisiana. Apparently, the costs of doing business in California (including filming a movie) are just too high. It's a sad comment on our state that moviemakers think it makes more sense to shoot a De La Salle movie in Louisiana, rather than in Concord. Just don't look for any scenic glimpses of Mt. Diablo in the movie. Hopefully no alligators will sneak onto the replica of Owen Owens Field!

Robert Schleicher

Danville

GOP doesn't need to copy Democrats

I read with bemusement a letter in which writer Dick Snider bids adieu to his long-term membership in the Republican Party.

Although he doesn't state the specific reasons I think it's because we need two parties competing for the illegal alien vote, two parties of intergenerational theft and two-party cronyism with the trial lawyers and the Green and Education Industrial complexes; unfortunately, there just isn't enough statesmanship and gravitas provided by Pelosi, Boxer, Feinstein and Reid to go around. Although his forefathers will roll over in their grave as he leaves the Republican Party, they can take solace knowing that as he adds his name to the Democratic rolls that the average intelligence of both parties will increase.


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David Fore

San Ramon

Massachusetts police, FBI did exemplary work

This is to salute and offer our standing ovation for the commendable job done by the FBI and the Massachusetts' police agencies in finding and dealing with the Boston terrorists.

Evidently, the terrorists were certain that they could not be caught and did not even care to have any escape plans. On the contrary, they were planning for another attack. They had no idea about the capabilities of the law enforcement authorities. The performance of the law enforcement authorities, in this case, is very reassuring for the nation.

Much as the traditional democratic judicial system is respected, the changing times demand that the procedural law for the terrorists (foreign or domestic) be modified thusly:

No Miranda rights should be allowed;

No Fifth Amendment rights should be allowed; and

No defense attorney at public expense should be allowed.

Only summary trials should be allowed and completed within three months before the memories of the witnesses start fading away and while the public passion is pitched for justice.

The law enforcement authorities have shown that they are keeping up with the times. Now it is the judicial system's turn.

T.S. Khanna

Alamo

Cut violence in media that kids consume

The Senate recently rejected several gun-control bills. Now it is time to discuss a topic that would actually reduce social violence -- namely, the problem of nonstop, uncontrolled depiction of violence in media.

Many refuse to admit it, but there is scientific evidence that young children exposed to uncontrolled violence in media (video games, graphic TV shows, etc.) have an increased tendency to commit aggression and violence against other humans. In 2000, the American Medical Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry provided a joint statement to Congress. Their message: media is a causal factor of violence in our society, and violent video games are particularly dangerous.

There is additional evidence from research conducted by Stanford University that removing the source of violence depiction significantly reduces aggression in children. It seems to me that now is the time to consider common-sense legislation that would restrict access to these toxic sources of violence by our young children.

Doug Henson

Livermore

Critic wrong, 'Stuck Elevator' is worth seeing

Those who enjoy music and theater shouldn't miss seeing ACT's "Stuck Elevator." This play deftly treats a universal theme of mankind's ability to cope (or not) with life's unfairness.

Don't be swayed by Karen D'Souza's largely negative April 18 review of this clever, poignant, based-on-truth story of what goes through the mind of a man stuck in an elevator for 81 hours. His thoughts and imaginings and reminiscences are put to song, a bit like Chinese Opera and a lot like Stephen Sondheim.

D'Souza found the play's Atlantic City revue scenes to be off-topic and distracting. On the contrary, those parts of the play give key insights to the trapped man's slipping grasp on reality and are critical to keeping the audience engaged. This show is highly entertaining. It's innovative theater at its best.

Holly Massey

Livermore

Hope pope acts as force for peace in world

My hope, as a member of the Roman Catholic branch of Christendom, is that the new Pope Francis will restore the most salient feature of Jesus' message: nonviolence, in today's violence-prone society.

In particular, I am thinking of the militarism that pervades so much of the international scene. Nations, large and small -- from North Korea to the mighty United States, boast of their power to destroy. Leaders seem to be immune to feelings of compassion for the suffering that war brings to their fellow humans.

To quote my authoritative Oxford Companion to the Bible: "-- the Sermon on the Mount epitomizes Jesus' ethical teachings, which include the Beatitudes (Matt. 5, 3-12)."

It is ironic that many Christian churches join with secular elements in embracing a version of patriotism based upon the notion that it is praiseworthy to rally behind the nation's leadership when a military action is launched, regardless of the legitimacy of the action: "My country, right or wrong." The teachings of Jesus, if considered at all, are regarded as irrelevant, or are twisted into an ethic that supports the violence, even glorifies it.

Donald F. King

Livermore