OAKLAND -- About an hour after practice ended Wednesday, center Andrew Bogut and guard Jarrett Jack were still in the gym. Bogut worked on post moves, Jack on his shooting.

That's exactly what Richard Jefferson is talking about.

"You didn't see that last year," Jefferson said. "Changing the culture is more than just about getting new players. There is a lot more that goes into it. ... I feel like with these vets, there are more guys that kind of understand what I'm saying."

Entering his 12th NBA season, Jefferson said it's refreshing to see the Warriors locker room infused with experience. Acquired from San Antonio in March, Jefferson said coming to Golden State was a "culture shock." He went from the reputed professionalism of the Spurs to a Warriors franchise in rebuild mode.

But Jefferson said he's encouraged by the attitude and work ethic now. He's quick to point out the infancy of the season, but he likes what he sees so far.

"Do we have the right attitude for training camp? Yes," said Jefferson, who will come off the bench Thursday night when the Warriors play host to Israeli pro team Maccabai Haifa. "Guys believe. Guys have bought in. Guys are putting in the work. But we haven't been tested yet."

Jefferson conceded he came into a tough situation last season -- several players hurt, the locker room shellshocked from the Monta Ellis trade, the lockout-shortened season taking its toll. Jefferson praised Mark Jackson's ability to hold the team together through it all and said he notices the second-year Warriors coach being more strict.


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Jefferson, Bogut, Jack and Carl Landry have been vocal with hopes of instilling the proper mindset. They set the example by how they carry themselves, as well as put bugs in the ear of the younger players.

Having these authority figures around has changed the tone. Their presence is especially important for the Warriors because of so many youngsters on the roster. Of the four rookies, at least two (forward Harrison Barnes and center Festus Ezeli) will be part of the regular rotation. One starting guard, Klay Thompson, is in his second year. The other, Stephen Curry has logged just over two seasons worth of games due to ankle injuries.

"It's a lot different having a lot of older guys in the locker room," second-year point guard Charles Jenkins said. "Bogut is a lot more serious than any player. He's a no-nonsense kind of guy. He jokes and all that. But once he gets on the court, all that stops. Same with (Jefferson)."

Jefferson has played with more future Hall of Famers than he can count on one hand. He has logged well over 6,000 minutes in 94 playoff games. He has played for the likes of Gregg Popovich, Larry Brown (with Team USA) and Byron Scott. He said he knows what a winning locker room looks like and how the players operate.

Practices are full of energy and passion. The weight room is active before and after practice. Film sessions and shootarounds are taken seriously. Pregame routines call for focus and preparation. Plane rides after losses, even sloppy wins, are quiet as players stew in disappointment.

He said he'll be looking for such behavior this season.

"All these are personal tests," Jefferson said. "Are you going to put in the work? Are you going to be accountable? Are you going to be on time every day? Are you going to put in the extra time? We've got the pieces here. Now we're getting the mindset down."

  • After coming off the bench the first two games, Barnes will start Thursday night. Barnes, in a battle with Brandon Rush for the starting small forward spot, will get a chance to make his case. "I don't want to guess how he'd be in the starting unit, I want to see it," Jackson said.

  • Curry participated fully in practice Wednesday, his third straight session without limits. He is expected to increase his minutes in Thursday's game after logging just 12 in Monday's preseason win over Utah. "My game will start to come back to me," Curry said. "I'm not far away."

    Thursday's game
    Maccabi Haifa at Warriors, 7:30 p.m.