LOS ANGELES -- The Warriors bounced from a tough loss to the Memphis Grizzlies and a demoralizing injury to swingman Brandon Rush by upsetting one of the best teams in the West.

Point guard Stephen Curry and backup forward Carl Landry each had 23 points as Golden State pulled out a 114-110 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers on Saturday night. The Warriors led by as much as 14 before holding off a late charge.

"That was a big win for us," coach Mark Jackson said. "That's a great team with a lot of great weapons."

The Warriors learned Saturday that Rush was done for the season after tearing the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee in Friday's home loss to Memphis. They responded by winning with defense.

The Warriors outrebounded the Clippers 48-33 and held them to 42.9 percent shooting. Curry sealed the win by drawing a charge on Clippers point guard Chris Paul with 7.5 seconds left.

Golden State did do a lot of fouling, leading to the Clippers making 40 of 52 free throws. But Jackson said he was proud of the effort.

"At times we play a little bit with our hands," Landry said. "But we were playing aggressive, and you're going to get fouls when you play that way."

Golden State dominated the boards in the fourth quarter, with David Lee grabbing six. Landry and backup guard Jarrett Jack each scored eight points in the final period, making sure the Warriors had just enough offense.

After a Curry runner put the Warriors up 109-107 with 1:25 left, the Clippers had a chance to tie the game. But Paul, who had made 18 straight, split two free throws. An untimely foul by Clippers forward Matt Barnes led to two free throws by Jack, putting Golden State up by 3.

Paul converted a driving layup, and Curry answered by hitting one of two free throws, opening the door for the Clippers to tie with a basket. But Curry made up for his brick by stepping in front of Paul and taking the hit.

"I knew I was there," Curry said. "I even looked down to make sure my feet weren't in the restricted area. I would've been upset if I didn't get that call."

  • The loss of Rush means the Warriors will be without their best scorer off the bench, their best perimeter defender, their proven sixth man.

    "It's a blow for us," Jackson said. "No question about it."

    Now the Warriors go about filling the hole in their rotation. Warriors general manager Bob Myers said his staff will explore all its options. One possibility being explored is the disabled player exception, which would allow the Warriors to to add a 16th player to the roster for 50 percent of the disabled player's salary (in this case, $2 million).

    The Warriors could also look to make a trade. But the most obvious option is already in the starting lineup.

    Rookie small forward Harrison Barnes is perhaps the Warriors' best bet. The No. 7 overall pick entered Saturday's game averaging seven points in 18.5 minutes, then scored 10 points in 20 minutes against the Clippers.

    "We need him, truth be told," Jackson said of Barnes. "What B-Rush brought to this team was experience, scoring punch, prime-time defense. We need Harrison to give us some of that."

    Said Myers: "It's a great opportunity for him. There is no question about his ability to play. I look forward to him responding."

    Saturday's MRI was relative good news, since it was feared Rush had suffered a more serious injury such as a torn patellar tendon.

    Members of the organization described Rush as devastated and distraught. But it seems the fifth-year swingman is resolved to make a return.

    "Been thru this before. Just gonna make me an all-around better player," Rush posted Saturday afternoon on his Twitter account.

    Surgery is not yet scheduled, but a Warriors official said Rush is expected to make a full recovery. He tore his right ACL in 2007 while playing for the University of Kansas.

    Rush posted career highs last season in scoring (9.8), field goal percentage (50.1) and 3-point field goal percentage (45.2). Jackson was relying on him for similar production this season.

    Veteran small forward Richard Jefferson, who totaled 23 minutes the first two games, now has an opening for more action. He scored nine points in 22 minutes Saturday night.

    Jefferson has some of the same attributes as Rush, including experience and a solid 3-point shot. But Jefferson showed Saturday he still can attack the basket, something Rush had added to his game.

    Jackson said rookie forward Draymond Green also stands to see an increase in minutes.

    "I'm definitely going to be ready when my number is called," Green said. "And if it's not me, I'll be cheering for the guy whose number is called."