OAKLAND -- The Warriors have outrebounded Denver, the top rebounding team in the NBA during the regular season, in all three games. Perhaps most remarkable is they've done it the last two games without top rebounder David Lee and haven't had a single player in double figures.

In Game 2, when the Warriors held a 36-26 rebounding edge, seven players had at least three rebounds led by center Andrew Bogut with eight. In Game 3, they improved on that. Six players had at least five rebounds, Bogut again leading the way with nine, as part of a 42-36 rebounding advantage. Golden State also had a 14-12 edge in offensive rebounds.

"We're really putting an emphasis on rebounding the basketball, not letting them get second-chance opportunities, which they're so good at," rookie Draymond Green said. "And it's been everybody. When you get Steph (Curry) and (Jarrett) Jack coming up with 5-6 rebounds each, that's huge."

"You don't replace David Lee," said Festus Ezeli. "Everybody just has to step their game up. The guards have done a great job coming in to help us rebound. It's our mentality right now -- the ball goes up, everybody's on the glass."

  • Ezeli and coach Mark Jackson both confirmed that when the rookie center jumped out to the wing to defend against Denver point guard Ty Lawson's drive in the final 10 seconds and forced a critical turnover, it was a planned maneuver.

    "I don't know if it surprised him," Ezeli said. "He just fumbled the ball. But we knew he was going to get the ball and coach told me to blitz him, and that's what I did."

    The Warriors waited until it needed a critical stop to employ the strategy they see executed against Curry so often. Lawson had been getting inside at will and had just converted about a minute earlier had dropped in a layup for a clutch three-point play.

    So the Warriors decided to take away Lawson's space and crowd him off the screen.

    "We hadn't shocked them all game long, and fortunately it worked out well for us," Jackson said. "I thought Festus did a great job jumping out without fouling him and letting the referees know where his hands were. It forced a turnover."

    Staff Writer Carl Steward contributed to this report.