OAKLAND -- The Warriors are upset with their recent play at home during what is supposed to be a favorable part of the schedule, but they're trying not to panic coming off a defeat against Charlotte.

Coach Mark Jackson said Wednesday that he was committed to a starting lineup that is 23-10 this season but struggled on offense Tuesday in a 91-75 loss to the Bobcats and has been getting off to slow starts in recent games.

"You show me a guy on that bench that's played well enough to force my hand to change it," Jackson said.

"We're not going to overreact individually or collectively."

The Warriors face the Chicago Bulls on Thursday at Oracle Arena after having shot a season-low 31.2 percent from the field against Charlotte for a fifth loss in their past seven home games that had fans booing.

"We should be ashamed of ourselves for last night, every last one of us," Warriors center Jermaine O'Neal said.

"Our fans stood around, and they're waiting to get crazy. They're waiting to get loud. And sometimes we give them nothing to cheer for."

O'Neal, an 18-year veteran, said the team for all its talent could not continue to heavily rely on its offense to win games and that consistent effort on defense can give the Warriors a better chance of success.

Center Andrew Bogut said he hoped the Warriors would bring more toughness after their offense was "horrendous" against Charlotte, scoring more than 20 points in a quarter only once.

"We're not going to miss layups and 2-foot shots every game, so I think we'll be fine," Bogut said. "There's no need to push the panic button. There's no need to change our offensive sets.

"It's disappointing when you have to come in here and talk about not executing properly, not having energy, not coming out with the right intensity. They're not things you can drill. You can't come to practice and have a drill to work on energy. That's the mind-boggling thing."

The Warriors are tied for sixth in the Western Conference standings and sit only a half-game ahead of Dallas for the eighth and final playoff spot.

"I don't want us to be in a position come late March, early April, and we're fighting for our playoff lives," O'Neal said.

"Right now, we're competing to make the playoffs, and that's the most disappointing part."

  • Klay Thompson said he doesn't often practice shooting at night, but he did just that on the eve of the Charlotte loss in order to get more repetitions and "see the ball go through the rim."

    He's not experiencing that as much during a slump that has left him shooting 29.4 percent from the field over his past five games.

    "When you go through a slump, the main thing is confidence," Thompson said. "You've got to act like you're going to make every shot."

    Thompson is fifth in the NBA at 37.8 minutes per game, but he said fatigue was not a factor in his recent accuracy issue. Shots were missed because he was rushing or not getting his legs into the act of shooting, he said.

  • O'Neal said his surgically repaired right wrist was sore after his first game since recovering from the injury, but he wasn't concerned about it and practiced.

    Thursday's game

    Chicago (24-24) at Warriors (29-20), 7:30 p.m. CSNBA